CORIELTAUVI  (Map)

The Corieltavi were, like their Brigantes neighbours to the north, a collection of smaller tribes, mostly agricultural and fairly unwarlike. They were centred on a swathe of territory stretching from modern Leicestershire, through Nottinghamshire to Lincolnshire (where they may have had a capital at Lindum) and perhaps including lower South Yorkshire, with Leicester and Old Sleaford their main bases. They built very few hill forts, perhaps only three or four in the entire territory.   An interesting feature of Corieltavi coinage in the first century AD is that it was regularly struck by two rulers at once, and at one time by three, all of whom were apparently colleagues. This suggests that the 'joined tribes' which formed the Corieltavi confederation still had their own kings who worked together for the good of their combined peoples. The tribe's name was traditionally thought to be Coritani, thanks to Ptolemy's Geography. However, other sources indicate that Corieltavi (or Corieltauvi) is the more accurate term.

BNJ Refs:

P. de Jersey,  ‘The discovery of the Lightcliffe hoard’, 77 (2007), 264-69

 J. May, ‘Coinage and the Settlements of Corieltauvi in East Midland Britain’, BNJ 64 (1994), 1-21, pl.

R. Mossop, ‘Further discoveries of Coritanian coins in Lincolnshire and Rutland’, 40 (1971), 171, pl.

R. Mossop, ‘More finds of Coritani coins in Lincolnshire’, 39 (1970), 162-63, pl.

 

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